Mar 122009
 

I’ve notice many of my favorite articles in the ASHRAE Journal are written by Mr Lstiburek Ph.D., P.Eng. I like his sarcastic writing style. I find it fun to read. His topics revolve around proper building construction and how it relates to HVAC. This makes sense as he’s a principle of the Building Science Corporation.

Some might think he’s a curmudgeon but it sounds like common sense to me. The ASHRAE Journal gets pretty dry at times so Joe gets my thanks. One of his many articles is “Some Old Lessons Distilled” about Bourbon Distillers in Kentucky. He tours an old distillery and shows how new distilleries are recreating the temperature swings and humidity control using newer and cheaper building materials. 

This is one of the few articles that seems to be available for free on the ashrae.org website. You can also buy a reprint of this September 2008 article.

Building in Extreme Cold

How to build a super insulated building north of the arctic circle.  Besides the interesting problems that derive from extreme cold (Even colder than North Dakota!), he manages some fun facts:

At minus 40 it does not matter whether it is Fahrenheit or Celsius as both scales cross at minus 40. Minus 40°F is equal to minus 40°C. Folks up north call it minus 40°FC for "freaking cold."

I remember asking why a blow drier is often hung outside the front door north of 66, and a second blow drier is hung inside the front door? Exfiltrating interior air carrying moisture leaking through the door hardware causes it to freeze solid. The exterior blow drier is used to melt the ice in the lock to get in. The interior blow drier allows you to get out.

 

You can also buy a reprint of this February 2009 article.

 


Why Green Can Be Wash

Mr Lstiburek explains what is wrong and what is right about trying to build Green. In a nutshell, he suggest reducing the amount of glass in the structure and being careful about Green Gimmicks.

Do “green” buildings really save energy? Can you be “green” and not save energy? The author says that designers too often chase “green points” and ignore important issues. However, he says most of the problems can be easily remedied.

You can also buy a reprint of this November 2008 article.

  One Response to “Joseph Lstiburek”

  1. In the December 2008 issue of Engineered Systems there is an article on about the Lakefront Library. This project seems at odds with “Why Green Can Be A Wash” – my take is the library is in a unique location (by a lake) and can take advantage of this micro climate. It is also true the engineers took care in the design and optimization of this library’s HVAC system.